Week 32: Final Reflections

This is the end of one journey but the beginning of another.  My time here at the farm has felt brief but as I consider my final reflections the experience seems profound.

The nature of Pepperfield effortlessly introduced me to a new collection of connections.  As a result, I met local producers, food and hospitality providers, community leaders and countless others.  Each one, touching on my journey and – knowingly or unknowingly – leaving a lasting impression; each new connection fostering the growth and development that I sought for so long.  Decorah was, and still is, a receptive, welcoming community that took me into the fold without hesitation. This last 32 weeks threw me into the active social scene in Decorah. I attended more parties and social gatherings than ever before.  Likewise, the people of Decorah have created something special: a progressive, loving community aware of each other and their surroundings. Similarly, it was this same community that acted as the conduit for so many unique culinary adventures.  But it wasn’t just food centered experiences that occupied my time.

During my time here I encountered work (and play) so fantastic that it’s hard to recall all of it.  But I do remember how fast it all started. Within months of arriving I had already secured a few jobs around town.  And soon after, even more. I saw the whole gamut from weddings to parties – and trust me everything possible in between.  Meanwhile at the farm, I was busy working away. Nearly 150 varieties were represented in our grow out this year and I had a hand in each one.  Farming isn’t an easy job and by the end of this season I had amassed some pretty impressive figures. In a two acre garden I managed to haul over 8300 pounds of manure, transplant 2577 times, plant over 4139 seeds and mulch 2863 square feet of ground.  This was exclusively the work I completed; these values would be much higher if tallied for the entire farm. My point is, I was quite busy. Simultaneously, I was still able to enjoy the nature around me. I took on foreign tasks like foraging for mushrooms, slaughtering a chicken and eviscerating animals to be used for eating.  The combination of experiences were truly rewarding as a person but also as a chef. (I can’t nearly cover everything from this season, but you can check out the happenings of all 32 weeks here!) Moving forward I will cherish these experiences but also everything that I learned in the process.

At its roots, coming to Pepperfield was always about learning.  From the beginning, my purpose was to learn how to grow food from the ground up.  Likewise, I hoped to take some time to myself and readjust my mindset. As I look back at what I learned at Pepperfield, it’s hard to imagine that I managed to learn all that I did.  Each day brought lectures from botany to esoteric philosophies challenging me on all fronts to observe, learn and retain. As a result I made one of the most profound discoveries of my life: food is a means of connection.  Not only does it unify us as people, but it brings us closer – physically, mentally and spiritually – in one way or another, no matter how abstract. And, as I explored these possibilities of food, I began to feel awake, alive and almost transcended.  

What started as a quest to slow down evolved into something even greater; changes to my body, mind and spirit, began to materialize.  Then, I began to achieve a more relaxed lifestyle. The tension, built from so many years of pain, anger and frustration began to melt into a serenity within that I can only describe as internal compassion.  I became aware of my choices and their consequences; I found peace with my mistakes and shortcomings. Similarly, I began the process of forgiveness with myself and began to reach out to share this with others in my life.  I felt an immense amount of liberation as I began to identify the origins of my problems and charted a new course to resolve them. I may be leaving Pepperfield, but I hope to continue feeling as creative, relaxed and motivated as I had previously.

Don’t forget, we’re on the road for the next week touring various BBQ shops across the nation.  More info on that tomorrow from the road. Stay posted, stay hungry (but not for to long)!

Week 31: The Penultimate week at Pepperfield

If you missed out on our recent update about some of our future developments, we encourage you to check it out here.  As I began to realize that this was my penultimate week at the farm, the whole experience I shared with the people and nature seems almost surreal.

Monday started with an early trip to the hospital garden.  I worked on cleaning up some of the beds while David harvested kale.  When we returned we took a quick break for lunch and then I worked on making some squash fettuccine.  It was nearly three pounds of pasta and took me the rest of the evening.  David and I worked on leftovers for dinner before calling it a night.  The next day I made a tomato sauce.  As it simmered away on the wood stove, I worked down in the garden pulling gourd vines off the fence.  Afterwards, I transitioned to the main squash patch and worked on pulling vines off the fences.  Then I switched to cutting down the old Jerusalem artichokes.  I took a quick intermission for lunch and then headed to town for my shift at work.  Things were dismally slow.

 

Wednesday morning I continued down in the squash patch.  I finished the last of the fence cleaning and then moved onto raking up the debris and weeds leftover from the growing season.  This ate up the rest of my morning.  I took a quick break for lunch before getting ready for town and my final shift at the job.  Unfortunately it wasn’t very memorable as we closed nearly an hour early after only serving 15 tables in six hours.  The next day I finished the clean up in the squash patch.  Then David and I went to the hospital so I could have a meeting with the nutrition director about an upcoming knife skills class.  It went pretty swiftly so I went out to the garden to help David tidy up a few things before we left to go back to the farm.  David and I finished the last round of leftovers and finished our day with a session in the sauna.

Friday was pretty laid-back.  I went to town midday to bring my car to the shop.  Meanwhile, I presented a 45 minute lecture and demonstration for the Winneshiek Medical Center kitchen team about knife skills.  Afterwards, I made use of my time at the hospital to work on cleaning up a few more beds.  I got back to the farm sometime in the early evening and decided to go to town to get some food.  I made a quick stop at the Armory and grabbed some tacos before heading back for an early night of sleep.  The next day I started my morning by stacking the final load of wood in to the wood shed.  Shortly after, I ran over to the neighbors with David to pick up some chairs they had borrowed.  David went to town for the evening and I stayed behind at the farm.  I did some work on a few projects before calling it another early night.

Sunday morning started late.  Mid-morning I made lamb braise and let it simmer away on the wood stove.  I spent time reading and relaxing while it bubbled.  Later in the afternoon David and I went to concert feature macabre music.  After we went to Carina’s to catch up and have a glass of wine.  As our conversations streched into the evening, we were invited to stay for dinner.  Carina put together a great meal of roasted chicken, sweet and sour cabbage and roasted vegetables.  This meal and time with both Carina and Micah was refreshing and fun.  It was a great ending for the week.

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Week 30: My Thoughts About Fall and More

Some people love fall; I do not.  The changes of the seasons might bring cheer to some but for me it’s rather undesirable.

leaves in the fall

 

Monday I put on my lumberjack gear to continue cutting wood.  As I worked away stacking and hauling wood for next year I began to reflect.  Observing my surroundings, I found it hard to see the beauty in fall, the changing leaves or bare trees.  Everything around me was dead or getting ready for winter.  No more lush trees, no more bountiful gardens, just dead plants and leaves everywhere.  Maybe I’m just the odd one out, missing the beauty of the nature around me.  I  believe I’m just not fascinated by the transition of nature into dormancy.  We worked until lunch on firewood and then took a break.  Afterwards, we continued working for a few hours.  When we finished, David and I got changed and went out to see the final performance of The Clean House, presented by the Commonweal in Lanesboro.

The next day David and I picked up where we had left off.  As we hacked away at the wood pile my mind began to wander.  Not only has this fall season been nature’s physical transition for the next season, it also has been a great time of reflection for me.  Even more so than spring and summer, I have been able to spend time reflecting on thoughts and ideas as I do – almost – mundane tasks around Pepperfield.  I understand they need to get done as part of the fall operations of the farm, but I came here to learn about food growth and processing, not Firewood Acquisition 101.  (I guess the sentiment I’m trying to express is disappointment or frustration.)  Not only has fall been the time for clean-up and changes, it also has acted as my jarring snap back to the reality of my life and the choices I make.  Unlike the plants, I’m just getting started.  Woodcutting took up most of our morning and afternoon.  After a quick lunch break, I left the house for a busy night of work.

making pasta in fall

Wednesday – that’s right, you guessed it – brought more woodcutting.  As I stacked, I began to think back to the beginning of my journey.  I have made so much personal growth and have this urge to continue.  Pepperfield has acted as a great catalyst for these changes.  Meanwhile it has provided an equally fantastic conduit for this growth.  But now, as my goals have shifted, so have my needs.  At the end of the day, I don’t mind cutting firewood or working on garden clean-up.  But I’m struggling to meet my goals and objectives as I sacrifice my time and energy here.  I am excited and anxious to get a jump on some of my upcoming projects.  Unfortunately, limited internet and cell service, busy days and early nights, among other things, make this nearly impossible at the farm.

Thursday was the last day of woodcutting.  Thankfully David and I had developed a decent rhythm so we only spent our morning on this project.  Things slowed down for the day and I did some computer work until I left for town.  The night at work was insane.  The next day I started my morning with clean-up around the house.  I threw a pot of goat stew on the stove to reduce while I puttered around.  Meanwhile, I finished the house chores by sweeping the floors and cleaning the stove top.  I left for work a few hours later for another busy night in town.

Saturday started to look a little more exciting.  After breakfast, I set my whetstone to soak for sharpening.  Then, I made a lemon poppy seed cake to use up some extra products we had around the house.  As it cooked and filled the house with a great lemon aroma, I worked on sharpening the kitchen knives.  I had forgotten how relaxing it was to just sharpen knives.  I made my transition to work mode as the afternoon progressed.  Then, I left for town to work with Ruth and Trout River Catering.  Ruth was catering a Luther College reunion and wanted me to help plate.  After a solid shift, I grabbed a beer and then called it a night.

Sunday I slept in until 10.  Afterwards, I got up and started my day.  David didn’t have anything pressing so I got to spend my morning working on some personal projects.  It was during this time that I really began to think about plans for Pans & Perspective.  I’m sure you’ve noticed (don’t think I haven’t) that the frequency of posts has begun to decline.  I don’t like to make excuses but I feel over-committed at this point.  Between my work here and in town, I have found increasing less time to work on creating quality content.  This is not permanent.  My time at Pepperfield is nearly complete; I’ll be bringing you an explosion of new content once I get settled back in Florida.

Thank you all for following my journey this year.  Personally, I am thrilled to be able to document my time and share a glimpse of it with all of you!  Don’t forget, next Wednesday will be our October AMA session; you can learn more about it here.

Week 29: Fall Clean-Up and Firewood

his last week has been full of outside work.  We have been stockpiling firewood in preparation for winter.

stacked firewood

The week started slow with some outside clean-up.  I spent my Monday working in the back pulling out dead plants and taking down fences.  I started by pulling out melons and eggplants.  Then I turned my attention to sunflowers and tobacco plants, both taller than me.  I tidied up the rest of the area by pulling the calendulas and weeds and then headed inside for dinner.  The next day I worked in the hoop house while David got organized for the day.  I cut two, five gallon buckets of squash for the baby goats before hopping the truck with David.  We went down the drive way and worked on cutting downed trees for firewood. After a few solid hours of work, I took off to town for an evening at the job.  Things we’re dismally slow.

Wednesday brought more wood cutting.  Much like yesterday, David and I worked until lunch gathering downed trees.  After lunch we headed over to Highlandville to help a friend of David’s dig potatoes.  She was thrilled and cooked us dinner.  We spent a great evening with her catching up and hearing about her life.  The following day I worked on getting some meals ready for the rest of the week.  I prepared a goat and vegetable soup and set it on the stove to simmer away.  Meanwhile I worked on a tomato sauce and some miso and cabbage.  I pulled my stuff off the stove for a little and went with David to pick up some chicken feed at a neighbors farm.  After that, I got myself ready for the evening and went to town for a steady night of service.

calamondins ripening as we cut firewood

Friday I started my morning with some more cooking by preparing a vegetable soup with the last of the peppers.  While that cooked, I worked on cleaning up the kitchen and around the house.  David and I ate an early lunch and then moved outside to work on splitting some of the wood we had gathered.  I took off a few hours later for a very busy night.  The day after I started my morning with some clean-up in the main garden.  I pulled the last of the amaranth and then moved onto cutting down the Jerusalem artichoke.  I continued to work in the garden finishing a few more projects before heading to a busy night of work.

David and I dedicated Sunday exclusively to firewood.  I worked on stacking and hauling wood to various areas while David ran the splitter.  We spent nearly our whole morning and afternoon cracking wood before heading to a neighbors farm to drop off our baby goats.  Afterward, we got a quick tour of his property and then headed back to our farm to finish some more wood.  Later, we enjoyed a warm fire as the evening dissolved.

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Week 28: And Just Like That, Snow…

We are now experiencing true autumn weather.  Our week ended with a small flurry of snow giving a beautiful appearance to the grounds of Pepperfield.

David and I began our Monday as usual.  After a quick visit to the hospital garden we spent some time in town running some errands.  Afterwards, we returned to the farm and worked on cleaning the last of the green amaranth.  Then I worked on getting a few items ready for dinner.  Korbin dropped in for the evening and we spent time enjoying good food and each others company as we caught up.  She brought a great gift of black trumpet mushrooms making the meal even more special.  The next day I started my morning by organizing squash.  We have an excessive amount, so I spent my time moving them to their final winter resting spots.  David and I spent the rest of the morning picking volunteer squash from around the farm.  Once we got done with that, we moved onto harvesting celeriac for winter storage.  I worked on cutting off the tops, while David cleaned up the roots.  This took a good portion of our morning and we took a quick lunch break just after.  I left for work a few hours later and spent a slow night in town.

Wednesday I worked on getting some meals ready for the week and an upcoming dinner.  I started my day by setting up a lamb braise on the wood stove.  While it simmered away, I focused on preparing some items for dinner.  I started by roasting red and white peppers for a roasted pepper topping.  After that I moved onto making a pear pickle.  Around mid-day, David discovered a massive hen of the wood mushroom growing up near the cabin so I took a quick break to help him harvest it.  Our dinner guests arrived shortly after and I worked on a few finishing touches.  The dinner involved five courses and started with a late garden salad.  Then I presented corn and zucchini pancakes with roasted peppers, pear pickle, squash butter and caramelized zucchini.  The next course was a Seminole squash risotto which was followed by braised beef over fettuccine.  Dessert was raspberry sorbet with some almond cookies and acted as a great closer for a fun meal.  The following day I worked on preparing the hen of the woods mushroom for drying.  This took about an hour and once I finished that I helped David dig up cabbage roots for next years seed crop.  Afterwards, I took off for work a few hours later for a decent night.

Friday, I focused on garden clean-up.  I started by helping David dig and clean amaryllis bulbs.  After that I pulled tobacco, pepper and rue plants that were done for the season.  I managed to get a fence rolled up before I left for town too.  We got slammed at the job with a huge push near the end after the football game got out.  The day after, I worked on some more clean-up, this time inside.  I focused on tidying up the kitchen and fridge before working on cutting up squash for the goats.  Then I setup some braised cabbage and left for the evening.  Work was quite busy again with a huge night of business.

It seems that my Sundays are restful.  After sleeping in, I stumbled out of bed.  I helped David make a pie for a party we were going to and then whipped up a quick ice cream to go with it.  David and I spent the day mostly in relaxation before heading to his daughter’s for the evening.  There was lots of pie – sweet and savory – and great company, crafting a great ending to a busy week.

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Thanks to our patrons, P&P is now entirely reader supported!  You have made a huge financial goal possible by connecting with the Community of Conscious Consumers (C3)!  (Check the link to learn more.)

We would first like to extend a heartfelt thank you to all our patrons.  Moving forward, we hope to continue producing the stellar content that you enjoy.  We are also looking to expand our team of writers to bring you even more awesome content.  P&P is still making plans for the monthly video update series and will keep you posted on its status.  Furthermore, we are making strides everyday on improving site and post readability.  Our time here at the Pepperfield Project is soon coming to a close.  We’re keeping the future of P&P (slightly) under wraps, but rest assured, things will be fantastic!

New Patron!

Thank you Barbara J. Buckley for your amazing pledge of support. Welcome to the C3! Barbara has made a contribution to P&P through Patreon. Find out how to do the same here!

September 2018 AMA

Topic/Focus

We are leaving the floor open to any topic. Please note that your questions (and our responses) will be featured the following day as post for the entire C3 at Pans & Perspective to see.

Frequently Asked Questions

“How do I ask a question?”

Please post your question below as a comment. We are standing-by to give a nearly instantaneous reply to your questions. Don’t be afraid to ask away, but try to keep topics separate. For example, if you want to ask about what were working on for the week and what Nathan’s favorite food is, post it is as two comments. (But asking our inspiration for a recipe and how to execute it would go great as a single comment.)

“Is anything off-limits?”

Even though this is an AMA session, we’d like to avoid polarizing topics. Favorite chef knife, game on – political preferences, not so much.

“Are there any stupid questions?”

There’s no stupid questions, just stupid people. In all seriousness, we hope to use these sessions to educate you and the other members of the C3 about P&P and food. We want this to be a relaxed setting where it almost seems as if were sitting across from you giving responses. In short, there are no stupid questions (or stupid people for that matter).

“What are the rules?”

Very simple: have fun and learn. We have a strict policy against inappropriate language; this includes, but is not limited too verbal discrimination – hate speech, racism or otherwise – verbal abuse or toxic behavior and intense profanity; we know that these can be used as “sentence enhancers” but we like to keep it clean for all our readers.

“How do i participate in the next AMA?”

We reserve this privilege for our patrons. But it’s extended to even the lowest tier of donation. Check out how to join the C3 and our AMAs here.

“When will you host the next AMA?”

As of right now the date is still up in the air. We want to get it down to a specific date each month. (That’s right, this may be the first, but it isn’t the last.)

“…Everyone is Entitled to Good Food”

To me, good food refers to food that is high quality and satisfying.  It’s something that can be categorized by these traits but also has many more meanings.

What is good food?

Although it is hard to narrow this down to a few simple parts, I am convinced that good food falls into two categories.  A term like good food is already quite vague and it refers to much more beyond some categories. But, I hope to explain some of my perspective and share my thoughts on it.

I believe that good food of high quality refers to food that uses high quality – unprocessed, fresh and nutritious – ingredients to create an equally high quality end product.  A perfect example of this might be a scratch tomato sauce; especially if using fresh tomatoes rather than canned. Scratch tomato sauce contains less additives and fresh ingredients resulting in a far tastier and nutritious sauce than its distant cousin Ragu.  But good food isn’t just limited to these factors.

It can also refer to something delicious or tasty.  Ideally this version of good food will also fall into the category of high quality; better ingredients generally yield a better end product.  But since “tasty” and “delicious” are subjective, that may not always be the case. My perfect example of a satisfying good food would be ice cream.  It would be made from scratch using local ingredients and purchases to create a delicious treat that also featured its prime ingredients and their producers.  But to some, maybe Ben & Jerry’s fills this category; that’s okay, either way – homemade or store bought – ice cream is satisfying good food.

This idea – “Everyone is entitled to good food” – is very similar to the concept of food security.  According the United Nations, food security is defined as “the condition in which all people, at all times, have physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious foods…”  But at its core, this component of my food philosophy has two supporting ideas.

Food is something beautiful and sacred and deserves to be shared.  Everyone should be able to partake in this regardless of physical, economic or social position.  A fantastic dining experience – both the service and the food – is something amazing and should not be reserved to the individuals willing to spend excessive amounts of money; and it’s starting to become more prevalent in places across the planet.  Now in even the tiniest corners, like Rushford, Minnesota (population 807), these exciting experiences are created from excellence.

Additionally, good food has the potential to connect people, promote growth, inspire ideas and recall cherished memories.  Hundreds of years ago, during the tobacco harvest season, slaves and owners would gather at the same table to partake in a feast – barbecue – to celebrate the end of the harvest.  Stigmas of racism that normally dominated everyday life were thrown out the window as this delicious repast connected two unlikely groups and cultures.

One of my fondest memories of good food dates back to my childhood.  As a surprise treat to go with dinner, my mother would make pasta salad.  This wasn’t anything fancy but it sure was delicious. Now, anytime I have my mother’s pasta salad, it brings me back to memories of family time around the table and the wonders of being a kid.  If good food isn’t shared with all it inhibits these possibilities.

No one should live their life without some access to good food.  It opens new doors and creates fantastic opportunities. This tenant of my food philosophy is one of the reasons I strive to create delicious and memorable experiences for my  consumers. Our world has many not-so-great parts, but I believe food can rekindle a kind and loving world while it provides a guiding light for all; I believe everyone is entitled to good food.

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